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Tag Archives: coaching

How To Make a Repeated First Impression

confidence-dictionaryEveryone knows how important a first impression is during a job interview.  But after the job is secured and you’ve settled in, does it really matter what type of impression you make on others?  Well, if you want to be effective in your career, then I say the answer to that question should be yes.  Regardless at what level your position is on the organizational chart, you should always be repeating that ‘first impression’ vibe because that’s how you can best display confidence at work.

So, whether you are an entry-level employee, a volunteer, or a CEO…take a look at these suggestions that you can practice every day in order to display the best ‘first impression’ again and again:

  • Clothes – It’s important to convey a polished, professional appearance in the workplace.  Looking the part exudes confidence to others around you.  Regardless of what you are wearing, be certain it is high quality, neat and proportionate to your body.  The old adage is “dress for the job you want, not the job you have.”  Also – avoid a lot of accessories and busy patterns that will distract others.  So, basically…be sure to look your best every time you step into the workplace.
  • Eye Contact – Establishing and maintaining eye contact with others is your best way to communicate confidence and interest.  When speaking or listening to someone, always look directly into their eyes for 3-5 seconds before looking away or moving to someone else.  This will show them you are interested and involved in the communication process.  If you constantly avoid eye contact, then you are viewed as insecure, anxious and somewhat evasive – which will erode any confidence.
  • Facial Expressions – There are seven basic human emotions (anger, sadness, contempt, disgust, fear, happiness, surprise) with scientifically proven facial expressions associated with each.  These expressions are often involuntary and unconscious.  Be aware of what your face is revealing to others and be sure to choose the right expression that matches the message you want to send.
  • Interactions – Initiate conversations with others.  Taking the initiative to interact with others displays confidence in yourself enough to walk up to a complete strange and begin a conversation.  Learning this process will boost your self-confidence and the confidence levels of others around you.

Gaining and maintaining the confidence of your workforce will go a long way when it comes to making tough decisions because many other attributes are associated with confidence – such as respect, loyalty and commitment.  I’m sure there are many other ways to make a repeated first impression, but the ones noted above will get your started on the right track.  Implement these suggestions today and watch how your confidence level increases dramatically.

 

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Fear: Change Your Thinking

FearAll of us have at least one thing we fear.  Some fear death and some fear spiders, while others may have the fear of heights or the fear of failing.  In a managerial position, the same concept is true.  Managers have fears about competition, meeting deadlines, quarterly earnings, etc.  So, how can we best overcome our fears?  Well, one of my good friends had a fear of riding roller coasters; however, one day he calls me up and says, ‘hey, let’s go to Six Flags.’  Of course, I reminded him that he didn’t like roller coasters, but he was adamant to go and conquer his fear.  He had looked up information online about roller coasters and he had watched simulation videos of roller coaster rides.  So, he was equipped and prepared to meet his fear head-on.

Therefore, the best way for managers to conquer their fears in the workplace is to change the way they think about fear.  This can be done by simply equipping and preparing themselves for a direct encounter with each fear.  This basically means doing just two things:

  • Turn Your Fears into Fascination Drivers – In other words, research and learn as much as you can about each fear.  What can you learn from it and how can you turn it into a source of positive energy?  If you have a fear about your competition, then learn everything you can about them.  What makes them tick?  What are their goals?  In what areas are they strong and weak?   Then, take this information and determine how you can re-frame it into a positive aspect that will be beneficial for you and your team.
  • View Your Fears as Opportunities – Start looking at fear as an indicator of something that needs attention…and not as something to avoid.  It’s a way to identify problems and issues and then to develop strategies to overcome those problems and issues.  Have a fear about an upcoming deadline, then take charge and develop a plan in advance with specific timelines for each step that’s needed in meeting your deadline.  Don’t procrastinate just because you have a fear because when you do that, then you’re allowing the fear to take control of your management process.

By becoming fascinated with your managerial fears and learning how to turn them into opportunities, you can become more effective in your day to day responsibilities and push forward into new, innovative areas that will advance the overall mission of your organization.  So this week, take time to list a few of your immediate fears and start changing how you think about each particular one.

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Making Your Word Count

Word

(Repost of ‘Your Word, Your Brand’ of April 5, 2013)

Most of us have certain defining moments in our lives that make us stop to ponder that age-old question, “Why do I do what I do?”  Whether you’re at the helm of a large corporation with thousands of employees or you sack groceries at the local neighborhood supermarket…we all have various reasons for the paths we take in life and at times it is important to reflect on the choices we make.  One of those defining moments for me was standing in my office on the morning of September 11, 2001 and watching the events unfold on television regarding the terrorist attacks in New York City and the countless lives that were lost that day.  On that day, it was no longer about meeting a print deadline or making sure enough ink pens were ordered or even making sure I got my car payment in the mail on time…it was all about ‘what am I doing to make a difference in the lives of others?’  That internal question defined a whole new way of thinking for me and changed the course of how I managed others.

For me, I quickly realized that there were no policies and procedures, no personnel manuals, no workplace training and no professional management courses that can replace your spoken “word”.  I would even go as far to say that the days of cutting a business deal with a simple smile and a handshake were back – for me, at least.  And looking back at that internal question of how am I making a difference, I knew that when I take away all of the glitz and glamor…my “word” was the most valuable tool I had to make a true difference.

As managers, it is so easy to get caught up in the day-to-day routine of business operations that we tend to forget that what we say and do affect many others around us – individual workers, multiple families, whole communities.  It’s easy to get riled up and ticked off at upper management or your colleagues or your customers (yes, even your customers can tick you off); but if you want to make a true difference – don’t let those things steal your joy or your passion for doing what you do because your word IS your brand.  When it comes right down to it…your ‘word’ – who you say you are – is all you have when you really want to impact and encourage your employees or when you are negotiating a business deal to bring jobs and revenue to your local community or when you’re trying to motivate others toward a common goal.

I experienced another one of those defining moments just a few months ago with the tragic loss of my 22 year old nephew.  Realizing how we all have such a brief window of opportunity to mark our spot in this world and to make a difference in the lives of others is an energizing and rejuvenating jolt that should bring us all back to the core of why we do, what we do.  There’s a quote by an anonymous writer that says, “You’re only as good as your word.  Use them wisely, and stick by them.  That’s capital worth investing in.”  We all need to heed this saying and integrate its meaning into our lives.

So, I guess this blog post is geared toward encouraging you to do your very best in keeping your integrity in check and being true to who you say you are – so you can truly make a difference in the lives of those who cross your path – whether it be your employees, co-workers, friends or even family members.  How you brand yourself speaks volumes to others.  I challenge you to take some time this week and reflect on how you can make a difference and what you can be doing right now – today – to make that happen.  Then, go mark your spot in this world!

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Need Managerial Inspiration? Consider Music

Need Managerial Inspiration?  Consider Music

 

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Time Management – Step #4 of 4

time expandedThis is the last step in our understanding of the perception of time and how we can best manage it.  Step #4 is learning how to expand time.  Most us have a narrow view of time – that is, we simply look at the seconds and the minutes that make up each hour…and the hours that make up each day; however, we should also look at how much we can pack into each of those hours…or how we can ‘expand’ our moments within a certain time period.  This final step of learning how to best manipulate time and manage it accordingly requires a great deal of creativity.  Mastering this technique will definitely separate the great leaders from the good leaders.

So, how can you expand time?  Well…it’s all about using all of your senses to experience each and every day.  In other words, become more aware of the importance of each minute and look for ways that you can experience a moment more indepth or how you can have a more meaningful experience regarding a specific time period.  Think of it this way – if time is wider, then you can fill it up with more things and take more from it as well.  Maybe this is similar to multi-tasking, but in a sense that you maximize all of your senses to experience a wider, fuller moment.  One example would be those individuals who enjoy rising early in the morning so that they have time to make coffee, read the paper and just take in the beauty of the morning before they begin the routine of getting dressed and out the door to work.  They are expanding time – using their senses to capture the moment.

Even though we can’t stop time or add extra hours to our days, we can alter how we experience and perceive the time we’ve been given.  If you can your relationship with time into a positive one, then you can experience a liberating life that allows you to focus on the important things.  So…as you can see, there’s a lot more to time management than just prioritizing which meeting you need to attend.  If you learn to measure time correctly, understand how circumstances affect your perception of time, determine how to best control your perception of time and learn how to expand it…then you’ll have a full grasp on how to manipulate the limited time we have so that you can be more productive, efficient and successful.  Try it out and see what happens!!   Also…be sure and follower me on Twitter – @craigholloman.   Have a great day!

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4 Simple Ways to Encourage Your Employees

encouragementMost of us do have a life outside of our employment.  Sometimes our work gets in the middle of our life events – such as kids ballgames, doctor visits, school plays, graduations, etc. and we have to adjust to participate; however, sometimes, our life events creep into our workplace, as well.  Given the current state of our economy, increased home foreclosures, difficult relationships, challenging family members and more, it’s easy to understand how workers have these things on their mind even while at work.  Most times, we never know what’s going on in the personal lives of our employees or those around us.  We never know when just a simple word of appreciation or encouragement might be the highlight of someone else’s day.

So, here are a few quick tips to implement into your managerial regime while you’re at work…and maybe, just maybe, you will make a huge difference in the life of at least one employee:

  • Be Attentive – Watch for signs from your employees that something is going on.  Things like tardiness, lack of performance, bad attitudes may be just a symptom of a deeper issue.  Also, be certain to really listen to your employees when they come to you.  Listening will help you determine in what areas your staff needs encouragement.
  • Be Positive – Focus on the positives instead of the negatives.  If you always expect the worst, that’s probably what you’re going to get.  So, look for ways to highlight the positive aspects of projects, employees, and teams.
  • Be Genuine – Don’t give ‘canned’ encouragement to your employees.  Saying ‘Way to go!’, ‘Good job!’ or ‘You can do it!’ can come across as a bit insincere and meaningless.  Find other ways to encourage your staff by asking follow-up questions like “how were you able to do that?  I knew you would.”  These types of responses tell the employee that you are really listening and are in-tune with what’s going on with them.
  • Be Real – You owe it to your employees to be direct and straight-forward without glossing over reality.  Every day can’t be all roses and rainbows and unicorns.  Make your employees aware of specific hurdles they may be facing at work, but then give them the tools to overcome those hurdles.  Being in the loop of what’s going on within the organization and knowing how it may affect them will give your employees more encouragement than you may realize.

Applying these four simple tips will help you to become a better person, a better manager and a better encourager to those around you.  And…just maybe some of that encouragement they receive at the workplace will carry them through those life events when they need just a little nudge to make it to the next day.  Have a great day and go mark your spot!!  Catch up with me on Twitter too – @craigholloman.

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Difficult Employees: Coach or Fire?

difficult employeeIt’s stressful for everyone when we have to deal with difficult employees on the job.  Whether they have a bad attitude, lack in experience or just don’t have the necessary skills to actually do the job…the manager must determine the best way to deal with the employee.  Often times, it will be one of two things:  either coach the individual to become a better employee, or let the employee go.

So, if you’re dealing with a difficult employee and don’t know what to do about it, then look at these steps to get an idea on how to proceed:

  1. Set Expectations with all employees when they are hired about what behaviors and actions are grounds for immediate termination.  Also, provide regular performance appraisals of the work being done (or not done).  This provides the employee an opportunity to correct any deficiencies in his or her performance.
  2. Act Immediately when you notice any performance issues that are substandard.  Don’t wait for the next appraisal review.  Inquire with the employee about what is causing the poor performance and then offer suggestions on how to improve.  Be sure to keep written records of these conversations.
  3. Focus on the problem or issue that’s causing the employee’s performance to falter.  Discuss the facts only without commenting about the person.  Then coach the employee on specific action steps needed to correct the issue.  Sometimes, this may require transferring the employee to another department or assigning different responsibilities that will better match his or her skills.
  4. Document all conversations, appraisals, courses of action, etc.  It is vital that you have an adequate paper-trail to show evidence of the steps taken to make the employee aware of the issue and how an adequate amount of time was given for corrective action.
  5. Give Warning to the employee when the next step will be termination if they continue to underperform and not meet specific benchmarks for performance improvement.  This way, the employee will not be surprised when you have to terminate his/her employment with the organization.

It’s never an easy task to terminate someone, but some individuals just don’t have the proper skill sets to match the requirements of the position.  That’s why it’s even more important to develop hiring procedures to determine and assess skill sets prior to offering a job to a prospect.  Take time this week to review how you deal with difficult employees, then try to implement some of the steps listed above to provide an opportunity for him or her to improve.

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